Appointments, appointments, appointments – My Cancer Journey

I forgot to mention during my appointment with my medical oncologist, I was advised that I would need a port. She showed me an image of a port and how it would look and feel under skin. She said that it would make all chemo injections so much easier. A tube would be attached to a neck vein and the nurses would just have to inject into the port. All I could say was, that is so gross!

The following week, I was scheduled for a ct and bone scan, chemo teach and port placement (I kept calling it a probe and Bill would roll his eyes – he got lots of practice with that with four sisters). You do have to agree with me that to have three appointments in a week is a bit much.

First was the ct and bone scan. Since two of four lymph nodes were diseased, we all wanted to be sure that the cancer hadn’t spread somewhere else. More needle pokes. Bill said I would end up feeling like a pin cushion (eye roll). I was given an iv and injected with a radioactive dye for the bone scan. Then I had to drink a substance for the ct and bone scan. Bill and I sat and waited for everything to take affect. A very pleasant technician passed out warm blankets to both Bill and I as the waiting area was fairly cool.

I was called in first for the ct scan. I will not forget this ct scan. The technician injected more fluid into my iv and warned me that my face and throat would get warm and that I would feel like I was urinating. She assured me that I was not wetting my pants since she had made certain I visited the restroom prior to the procedure. The sensation was indeed strange. My ears got hot. My face and throat got warm. Then I pulled my legs together as it felt really, really strange down there. But it passed soon enough and I was moved into the machine. The procedure lasted approximately ten minutes, the iv was taken out of my arm and I went into the waiting area.

We were told that the bone scan would be done in 90 minutes so Bill and I decided to head over to the hospital cafeteria to grab lunch. I hadn’t been allowed to  eat anything prior to the ct scan.

I should also mention that I have osteoporosis. I had been taking Fosamax once a week but in 2016 asked my doctor if there was something I could take once a year. I had seen television commercials about yearly injections and thought this might be better for me. I would not always remember to take the Fosamax so my doctor suggested Reclast. I was told by the medical oncologist, my osteoporosis is something they would have to watch.

The bone scan came next. Bill was able to sit in the room while I was in the machine. He found it interesting. Since I was told that I had to lie completely still, I fell asleep. It was a very small tube that I was put in but I had no problems with just closing my eyes and falling asleep. Thank goodness, I did not snore. This procedure took approximately 30 minutes.

We were then released and the technician wished me well. He said he hoped that I would receive good news. I really appreciated his words. Later that day, we found out that both scans came back clear. On to chemo teach and my port placement.

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